End of month view – July 2017

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Every month, for a day or two leading up to making this regular posting, I muse on what I am going to say. Mostly I am thinking about the garden overall, rather than about specific plants, but overall is the sum total of what key plants are doing, so there’s overlap.
This month I had formed a strong impression that the earlier stuff was all but over, a little earlier than usual because of the hot weather, but the later stuff was perhaps a little behind because the ground had become so dry.
So I took this picture from our bedroom window and compared it with the same view from a year ago. Virtually identical. Seems like my June gap comes in July, though It’s not too pronounced. A little more effort to get dahlias and fuchsias going strongly earlier and I will have cracked it.

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The viewpoint I have used back towards the house has been all but closed off by the Schefflera and Pittosporum at the bottom of the picture. I put the camera on a monopod and held it aloft as high as possible, taking the picture with a cable release.

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I used the same technique for this shot. The polytunnel and the camellias and Magnolia immediately behind it are in the far corner of our patch. Last year I had a pink dahlia amongst the oranges and reds behind Herman the Head. This year I put it elsewhere but planted out the pink hydrangea, so there’s the same clash. I thought it would be over by now, at least that’s my excuse.

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This is probably my favourite bit at the moment. Helenium ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer’, with a Shasta daisy behind it, which always flops. The taller Helenium to the right is ‘Chipperfield Orange’. I have Mina lobata growing up the metal obelisk, it can sprawl over the Helenium and keep the flowering going into the autumn.

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I don’t often mention the front, but we have just for all out vulgarity with bedding in pots, tempered with several Eucomis and Agaves montana and parryi which stay out all year round. So much crap is talked about bad taste in gardening, a few years bag Dahlias were the epitome of vulgarity, now they’re the height of fashion. I can’t be bothered with it. Bright colours are uplifting, the end.

End of month view – June 2017

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Two things struck me when I compared this picture with the same view a year ago. The first was that the flowers are a couple of weeks ahead of last year. The second was how little the view had changed. I found myself searching for the small differences between the two images.

For some reason I find that slightly dissappointing, without really knowing why. Perhaps because it seems like I’ve done lots of work in it and planted lots of new plants and there doesn’t seem to be a lot to show for it.

On the other hand, a lot of garden maintenance is directed at keeping things the same, on the basis that you have it looking how you want it to look and are trying to keep it like that for as long as possible.

Big changes are all too often not of our choosing, a large plant dies or a tree blows down. It often takes a disaster like that to significantly refresh an established garden though, and with hindsight will often come to be seen as having been a positive.

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There is still bare soil to be seen, with Dahlias, Salvias and the like taking their time to fill out. A lot of my Dahlias were slow to start this spring, I think I need to find somewhere warmer to get them under way earlier. Consequently I planted half a dozen out a week or so ago and a similar number today.

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Eryngium giganteum

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Geranium ‘Nimbus’

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The first Helenium ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer’ of the season.

Hydrangea

The double Hydrangea we bought last year is doing well.

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Hydrangea serrate ‘Tiara’

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Euphorbia lathyrus and unknown Clematis.

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Bobby

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Of Colour and Chaos

End of month view – May 2017

Come in, please, I’d be delighted to show you round my garden. Can I suggest you put on over-trousers, there are places where the path gets narrow and it was drizzling earlier, everything’s a bit wet.
Let’s start round here, I’m afraid I didn’t get to my poppy in time to stake it. Seemed to go down overnight. My Camellia ‘Nightrider’ is leafing out as beautifully as ever. That’s coming over the path too, suppose I’ll have to trim it back before long.

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This bit beyond the trellis is pretty shady. The Weigela has done better this year than for a while. The bamboo is getting a bit unruly, I’ve already taken ten or more stems out where they were leaning across the path. I use on the allotment for my runners. That

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thing down to your left there, that’s Polygonatum mengzense tonkinensis HWJ573. Hinkley and Wynn-Jones, need I say more. OK, the flowers aren’t stunning, but it’s a very elegant little plant. That’s Impatiens omeiana behind it, but you knew that. That’ll flower much later, provided I keep it moist. The Polygonatum has bright red berries right along the stem, I got seed out a few weeks back and sowed them; nothing yet. That big clump over there is Blechnum chilense; it’s too happy, trying to take over the garden. I love the new fronds unfurling but I’m going to have to chop it back.

Pot-Camellias

That’s all my pot grown camellias to your left there. Why in pots? Well I wish I had room to put them in the ground but I don’t. Some of them are a bit tender too, they go in for winter. That Polygonatum over there, the one the cat is sniffing, is just your common or garden Solomon’s Seal. Usually gets trashed by sawflies, this year, nothing. I squashed a couple of adults and rubbed off a couple of batches of eggs, is all. Right, this way.

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I sorted out my polytunnel. That’s where all that junk on the path came from. Agapanthus, that one, enormous, biggest I’ve ever seen when it’s growing well. In the tunnel? mostly camellias, tomatoes too. The toms provide shade for the camellias. The plan is to go to a show next year and sell loads. Camellias, not tomatoes. That’s my home made family apple tree just there. I did six grafts back in January, three varieties, all took. They’ve made just as much growth as the established shoots. Even some apples on one of ’em, though I should really remove them. Come on, this way. There is a path under

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these neriness, be careful though, they’re awful slippy. Worse later when the leaves die down. This paved semi-circle was our top of the garden sitting area once. Look at it now.

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The glasshouse is half empty, you can actually walk to the other end. The other half’s obsession, cacti.

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Right, push past the Chionochloa and mind where you’re treading. The Dianthus are just the thing for breaking up the edge of the path. Paving slabs are very practical, but the less I see of them the happier I am. I’d normally have chopped the Fuchsias back but they didn’t stop flowering all winter and if I did it now the bumble bees would be well pissed off. I love the colour of that geranium. While you’re here, just cut through the border there and clamber up the bank. Look at that view down the back of the glasshouse. Not

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bad for a bit no-one sees. Yes, that is Fuchsia excorticate coming through the fence, well recognised. Actually, while we’re up here, I’ll do my every month shot from here. The Schefflera taiwaniana is getting bigger, I’m going to have to move my viewpoint slightly.

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Another few years and the Schefflera and Pittosporum will be fighting it out. Further round the path is blocked with fuchsias I’ve potted up into 7.5 litres. Oh, and pot grown spuds, and lettuce. Yes, Dahlias too. They should have been out by now, bit slow to get going.

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Oh gosh, look at the time, I can see you need to get going. I’ll just leave you with some pictures, you can browse them at you leisure.

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Thrown together as my contribution to the Patient Gardeners end of month meme. There’ll be links to many more I don’t doubt.

 

End of month view – April 2017

Butternut-Squash

These are butternut squash seedlings on my window ledge. It’s raining outside, which is a very good thing; steady, hour after hour. What happened to April showers?

April has seen masses of stuff coming into leaf and flowering like mad. It has also seen weeks of dry weather and the threat of frost on half a dozen or more nights. Much time has been expended on watering and moving tender plants in and out of greenhouses. I have runner beans germinating on the spare bedroom floor. Cucumber ‘Carmen’ are on the window ledge too, not far short of flowering.

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I suppose I should have seen the forecast and taken pictures yesterday, but I like the way that rain seems to intensify the colours, not that Camellia ‘Bob Hope’ needs it. The Hakonechloas are growing away well and the Acer has so far escaped the damage from cold wind it often suffers.

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Camellia ‘Bob Hope’ and Acer palmatum ‘Atropurpureum’

 

The other Camellia that is always very late is ‘Nightrider’. It’s just beginning its flowering and will soon produce new growth of a similar colour to the blooms. It’s about six feet tall now and will need curtailing before much longer.

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Camellia ‘Nightrider’

Years ago I raised a couple of seedlings of what I believe was Rhododendron atlanticum, a deciduous azalea with superb scent. Neither seedling bears much resemblance to their parent but one is pretty good and has at least as strong a perfume. It’s a shame deciduous azaleas are so tricky to propagate, it’d be a nice thing to give away.

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Rhododendron (Azalea) seedling

Holboellia brachyandra doesn’t have quite as strong a perfume but it does carry a little further in my experience. There are times when its vigour gives me concerns, but there’s a fence to cover and trees to climb. It’s a Crûg Farm plant, which will surprise no-one familiar with their catalogue.

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Holboellia brachyandra

Maianthemum racemosum and its variety ‘Emily Moody’ are flowering now. Not a big difference between them, ‘Emily Moody’ came up a couple of weeks later but has now caught up; they’re both starting to flower. ‘Emily Moody’ has in previous years won hands down on scent, I haven’t checked this season yet.

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Maianthemum racemosum

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Maianthemum racemosum ‘Emily Moody’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bells; blue, pink, white and yellow, abound. I suspect that all our bluebells are hybrids between English and Spanish, some close to one species, some to the other. Yellow comes from Uvularia perfoliata. Disporum, Polygonatum and Convallaria will provide me with green and white bells shortly.

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Out from the shady areas Libertia x butleri is putting on the glitz this year. It was poor last year, great the year before that. This is a newly named hybrid between L. chilensis and L. ixioides which sowed itself. I grow both parent species and this spontaneous cross is apparently not uncommon.

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Libertia x butleri

A couple of other things warrant a mention. I grow a few Muscari but I think ‘Blue Spike’ might be the showiest and longest lasting. Camellia ‘Minato-no-akebono’ has finished flowering but is keeping things going with lovely new leaves.

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Muscari ‘Blue Spike’ and Camellia ‘Minato-no-akebono’

 

I have a few fruit trees in the garden, mostly apples. One tree of ‘Elstar’ produced small scabby fruit in its first couple of years and I am gradually turning it into a family tree by grafting other varieties onto it. This winter saw the addition of ‘Plympton Pippin’ and ‘Tregonna King’ two old west-country varieties, and ‘Meridian’, which is a modern one. They join ‘Holstein’ and ‘Red Windsor’ that were done a couple of years ago and are fruiting already. I also grafted ‘Holstein’ more conventionally onto MM106 to make a normal single variety tree.
Apropos nothing, my grandfather was a nurseryman in Plympton many years ago. There’s a housing estate there now; that’s progress.

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Apple ‘Holstein’ and new family members Plympton Pippin (flowering) and ‘Tregonna King’

And so to garden views. We have scaffolding up and it’s raining. The scaffolding rather spoils one of my usual views but on the other hand it provides a new viewpoint.

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The sooner this goes the better.

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View from the scaffold, seagull on the chimney perspective.

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Even higher, monopod held aloft, cable release. Drone view, without a drone.

Now it’s off to The Patient Gardener, host of the EOMV meme, to see her post and the links to everyone elses.

End of month view, March 2017

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There’s quite a bit flowering now, bulbs and bushes. I’m not sure how but we still have three magnolias, used to have five. The one behind the polytunnel is Vulcan and it’s slowly falling over. It might be possible to push it back up and prop it, I hope so. The plum tree on its right is flowering well this year. Need to prune that a bit in the next few weeks.

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Magnolia ‘Vulcan’

 

The weather has taken a turn for the worse again, it was quite good earlier, now the wind and rain are back. It’s that time of year. If I’d been more organised I’d have put an entry into the Cornwall Spring Show, it being just up the road from here. I just popped out and took pictures of my various camellias, I think I would have managed to enter a few classes. Too late now.

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Top row: Mystique, Tinker Bell, Minato-no-akebono, Bob Hope                                  Second row: Bob’s Tinsie, Annette Carol, Kokinran, Charles Colbert

Lots of things are pushing through the ground and confirming that they survived the winter. Some are not and the worrying begins. Ginger family things are always late, Roscoeas, Hedychium and Zingiber in my case. I’ve seen a rapid increase in slugs just in the past week or so, bane of my life. The torch and secateurs evening routine needs to get started.

Slugs are very selective, some very delicate looking plants are untouched. You’d think someone could work out what deters the little buggers and bottle it. Adiantum venustum is a very delicate looking but remarkably tough fern that is never eaten. The white flowers are of Pachyphragma macrophyllum, good in shade and seeds about somewhat.

Adiantum-Pachyphragma

Crûg Farm Nursery will be at Boconnoc for the Cornwall Spring Show, last year’s purchases included Chrysoplenium davidianum, which has grown remarkably well considering it looked like it was dying of drought most of last summer. I have a few blue wood anemones, labels long since vanished.

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I follow a few allotment blogs and I cannot understand how at this time of year people have loads of empty space for all their seedlings. Every bit of covered space I have is stuffed with overwintering fuchsias, sprouting dahlias, tender camellias and much else. There is never enough room for growing and spacing seedlings. So they get put outside wherever possible. This lot will have to go back in though, before the weather trashes them.

Seedlings

As ever, I am spurred into monthly action in order to be part of Patient Gardener Helens end of month meme. Check out hers and everyone else’s contributions at https://patientgardener.wordpress.com/2017/03/31/end-of-month-view-march-2017/

End of month view – February 2017

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I do like a different viewpoint. You get very familiar with your own garden and it can get difficult “to see oursels as ithers see us”. I know the top viewpoint very well, but the bottom one I find much more engaging as it’s unfamiliar. I find myself looking closely at it, noticing patterns and relationships I’d been unaware of. All of this may be lost on you, being unfamiliar with both views. I just suggest you try for yourself.

For me the mood that characterises this time of year is impatience. So much is beginning to move but is actually not much further on from a month ago and wont be much further on in a months time. Then summer comes and it’s all over too soon. There seems to have been a lot of dull, cold and wet weather in February and I haven’t spent a great deal of time in the garden. I suspect there was a time when I’d have put on a coat and hat and got on with it.

I do love my daily circumnavigation at this time of year; almost every day is rewarded with something new being spotted re-emerging or opening a bloom. I gave away a huge chunk of Trachystemon last year and it’s back twice the size this. Great in dry shade I’m told.

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Trachystemon orientalis

I keep reading blogs where people are talking about putting in more bulbs. The only daffs that succeed with us are in pots. Not a single one remains of all the hundreds that have gone into the ground over the years. I’m planting more cyclamen though, they seem to seed happily enough. Muscari do too, almost too much, I’m trying to get different sorts to extend the season. Erythroniums too, I think might be a winner, slugs permitting.

And my camellias are flowering, so I’m a happy bunny.

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Camellia ‘Adorable’ and a pot of daffodils.

Right, off now to check out other gardeners contributions to The Patient Gardeners end of month meme. Come along, it’s always fascinating.

End of month view – January 2017

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The weather forecast had promised a bit of brightness but I gave up waiting and took a few dull shots. It was raining soon after, and still is.

The garden is down to its bare bones at this time of year and a comparison with the picture I took a year ago shows very few changes. Almost too few, few enough to get me asking myself if it has become too static. A couple of sizeable woody plants have gone, I really don’t miss them; which suggests I’d have to get brutal to make an obvious difference.

As usual, the dead leaves of Hakonechloa are the brightest thing in the garden. I’ve cut down most of them, they’d been fairly well trashed by the cats jumping in them. Other than that it’s down to the evergreens. Pittosporum ‘Elizabeth’ on the right is so good we’ve planted another. The tree at the left is Ligustrum ‘Excelsum Superbum’, which looks really good all winter then tatty in spring until it has grown new leaves.

I wired the fastigiated yew in this year as it was losing its shape. It’s about 14 feet tall now, which is not a good height to be trying to get a loop of wire around it. Looks better for it though and the narrower I can keep it the longer it can stay. The other conifer is the ironically named Lawson cypress ‘Little Spire’.

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Looking back the other way it is clear that my Schefflera taiwaniana is going to make taking this shot from the same place impossible in a couple of years. The deciduous tree just right of centre is Magnolia Heaven Scent, below it Camellia ‘Bob Hope’. The prominent grass is Chionochloa rubra.

On a smaller scale I have snowdrops flowering. I like snowdrops could never become a fanatic. Mine are doubles, I don’t know their name. If I didn’t keep inadvertently digging them up they’d be doing rather better. I have some nice Cyclamen coums still in pots and needing planting. The two double Hellebores I bought last year are back, which is good, and not entirely healthy looking, which is bad.

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Looking slightly battered, such that most of its flower display is on the ground, is my Camellia ‘Minato-no-akebono’. I have a somewhat unhealthy obsession with Camellias; unhealthy because there are an awful lot of them, they grow large and I have a pretty small garden. It does force a high level of selectivity on me though and Minato is a very pretty single with lovely scent. I don’t mean the somewhat heavy oily scent of the sasanquas, this is a light and fresh true perfume. When it has finished flowering the new growth will be bright red for a couple of months. It’s a cracker.

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As ever, my motivation to put finger to keyboard is to be part of the Patient Gardener’s end of month meme where there will be links to other participants.